Why Don’t You Just Get a Job?

At face value, the cause of homelessness for most of our clients seems pretty clear – they don’t make enough money to pay their rent and utilities. Many of them have no jobs, or if they do it is a part-time and/or minimum wage job. So what they need to do to stabilize is get a job, or get a better job, or get a second job, right? What could be more simple?

Were it only that easy! In truth, the causes of our clients’ homelessness – and the solutions we have to find in order to overcome them – are both broad and complex. Certainly, there are some who come to us for help who have the abilities to be independent and have been in the past, but simply hit a hard time for various reasons and just need a little help and support until they get back on their feet. For them a safe place to stay, a little help with transportation, some encouraging words, and they can fairly quickly get back on their feet. But these kinds of situations are a very small portion of who we serve. In fact, Pilgrims’ Inn has built a reputation for taking in (and taking on) persons with very difficult situations to resolve, and very complex and difficult barriers to stabilizing. We frequently accept shelter clients that have been refused by other shelters due to the expected difficulties of getting them “on their feet”, as well as persons who have been at other local shelters but had to leave without seeing any real improvement in their situations.

The following list includes real life examples of just some of the daunting challenges our clients have had to work to overcome, and in most cases they have faced down a combination of these factors:

  • Poor education, no high school diploma, no job skills, have been out of any kind of formal school for years.
  • Low self-esteem and low confidence, to the point of feeling paralyzed and hopeless about ever finding a good job.
  • Poor physical health, including chronic pain, weakness, frequent bouts of symptoms that prevent going to work.  conditions that require heavy medication.
  • No clothing that is appropriate for either job interviews or to wear to a job once hired, and no money to purchase new clothes, even from a second-hand store.
  • Mental health challenges, including a chronic condition such as anxiety disorder, bi-polar disorder, post traumatic stress disorder, etc.  In many case their brain chemistry literally betrays them, making them vulnerable to poor judgement and odd or destructive behaviors.  Deep depression – a frequent occurrence for those who have struggled with homelessness and risk for any length of time – can be paralyzing, regardless of good intentions.
  • Lack of safe, affordable child care – if you don’t have a safe solution for someone to watch your kids while you’re working, you can[‘t exactly lock them in a box and go to work anyway.
  • Children with chronic health problems can cause parents to miss too much work time while either seeking medical treatment for their child or simply staying home to take care of them, leading to lost jobs.
  • Lack of transportation – once you get a job you have to get there!  Missing too many shifts due to not being able to find a ride leads to quick termination.
  • Poor dental health – very few of our clients can afford a dentist.  If your teeth are unsightly, ache all day, and cause severe bad breath, it is next to impossible to put your best foot forward to either get a job, or keep one.
  •  Having grown up without any good role models of responsible adult behavior.  Many of our clients have not learned good “people skills” and /or work ethic to apply to an employment situation.  If they have poor manners, are frequently not on time, are emotionally immature or volatile, are impatient or disconnected, they are unlikely to get hired and unlikely to stay employed once they get a job.  While it may seem difficult for some of our readers to understand, if you grow up in a family where these kinds of behaviors are the norm, it is very difficult to even recognize how they can hamper success, and even harder to change.
  • Alcohol and drug abuse – something people in a great deal of pain and fear often turn to as a means of finding relief – make it nearly impossible to remain stable enough to handle the demands of a regular job.

We have a broad range of programs and a very skilled and dedicated staff that address these kinds of issues and many more, but turning life-long destructive patterns and realities around can be daunting, difficult, and sometimes expensive.  It is also a process that does not happen over night.  One of the main reasons a significant portion of our clients give up before they can fully stabilize is because the hard work and risk of facing down a plethora of these issues, coupled with the frequent set-backs and disappointments that most of our clients experience,  can simply wear a person down.  Of course, the flip side of this struggle is, there is nothing quite like sharing the moment when a beaming mom who has toughed it out for months to overcome a long list of challenges sails down our hallways to joyfully announce “I got the job”!

There are many ways you can be a part of the solutions that help even the most challenged of our clients to make their way to a better life for themselves and their children.  You can support us financially, to help make sure our programs continue to be available to serve as many clients as possible;  you can bring donations of items such as food, cleaning supplies, furniture and household wares to help clients who do not have enough; you can volunteer your time for anything from cleaning, to handing out food orders, to reading to children, to helping transport, and much more.  If you are an employer, you can talk with us to see if we have clients who could meet your needs for new employees, or if we could incorporate training or other preparations to help someone become a good fit for your organization.

If you’d like to know more, I invite you to give us a call and explore the possibilities.

Pilgrims’ Inn – 803-327-4227 – pilgrimsinn@comporium.net

Published in: on January 22, 2013 at 12:03 am  Comments Off  
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Your Most Meaningful Mother’s Day Ever

Mother’s Day is just around the corner. If your mom is like most, out of all the beautiful cards you’ve ever gotten her the one she cherishes most is scribbled in childish crayon with a smudge in the corner, and she’s saved it since you were 5. Of all the nice gifts you’ve given her, the one that still brings the biggest smile is likely some lopsided clay thingy that you made with your own pudgy fingers when you were a kid. After reading this article I hope you’ll give your mom a gift that will be truly remarkable for a different kind of reason. Here at “The Inn” we have many moms who also love their children fiercely, but their life circumstances make it very difficult for them to keep their kids safe and healthy, let alone happy and carefree. I would like to challenge you to make a difference for these moms, by supporting our work in honor of your mom. And, beginning next Saturday we will be devoting an article on the front page of our website, as well as an article in our summer newsletter, sharing what you were inspired to do to honor your mother (see the final paragraph for more details).

There are many ways to do this – make a monetary donation in your mom’s name. Volunteer some time to help accomplish our work – again in your mom’s name. Do a drive with your friends and co-workers – we have needs for supplies ranging from food, cleaning supplies, office supplies, diapers, and more. Even more fun? Do something in your mom’s honor related to one of our summer fundraisers.

Chris Hope, a beloved local son and renowned NFL veteran, is donating all proceeds from his annual iCHOPE Charity Basketball Game on May 19, to support our programs. The players will include Chris as well as many other famous NFL players, some who have local ties and others from around the country. Buy a ticket and take your mom to the game, or buy a bloc of tickets and take the neighborhood kids with you, all in her name, or donate a bloc of tickets to Pilgrims’ Inn in her name so that our clients and kids can attend. www.iCHOPE24.com

Is your mother a lady golfer? Sign her up for our 13th annual Irish Open Golf Tournament. She doesn’t golf? Sponsor a hole in the tournament. Hole sponsors have signs erected at each of the holes to advertise their business, etc. (about the size of a real estate yard sign). Sponsor a hole and display a sign telling the world that your mom is one in a million.  www.pilgrimsinn.org

The moms we serve face some of the most daunting challenges you can imagine – poverty, health problems, mental health problems, lack of education, lack of transportation. Many of them have been traumatized in a variety of life tragedies. Some of them have been brutalized by the very people they should have been able to trust the most. Yet I see them fight to make a better life for their own children with such courage, and integrity, and determination. Make this your Most Meaningful Mother’s Day Ever by supporting these moms (and their families) in their journey to stability and independence.

To learn more about the above events, to learn how to make donations or volunteer, or to get more ideas, go to www.pilgrimsinn.org or call us at 803-327-4227.

SPECIAL NOTE:

Beginning next Saturday and throughout the month of June on our website, we will be posting an article that lists the ways that any of you choose to honor your mothers.  We will also include the list in our summer newsletter.  Be sure to let us know when a donation or action you’ve taken to support us is in her name.  Add a brief sentence or two explaining why she is so special.  We will help you share your love for her in a special way.

Published in: on May 6, 2012 at 2:35 pm  Comments Off  

HUNGER GAMES – not the movie!

I am an avid reader, and recently finished the wildly popular “Hunger Games” series, by Suzanne Collins.  I’m a little surprised that these books are listed as “young adult”.  At the age of 53, I personally found them to be intriguing.  I read the series straight through in about a week’s time, and I am enthusiastically looking forward to the movie version’s release this spring  (I guess that makes me “young at heart”, eh?).

As the director of an agency that serves hurting families in our community, including those without adequate food, I often think about parallels between books and movies that I see and our clientele.  The very title of this series gave me something to think about…hunger games.  In 2011, we filled over 4000 requests for help with food.  That number represents over 4000 times that someone opened our door and told us that they did not have enough food for themselves, and their kids.  That number represents thousands of pounds of beans, vegetables, pastas, rice,soups, and much more going out our door to those in need.  That number represents many hours of effort on the part of our staff and faithful volunteers to collect, bring in, organize,bag up, and hand out one of life’s most basic necessities.

(NOTE: for a great article on hunger in America, be sure to read Marian Wright Edelman’s most recent article on the Huffington Post:  http://tinyurl.com/7xh6xn7 )

That number also represents a lot of “hunger games” that our clients have to play, and believe me these games are not the  fun kind, but rather are a process of quiet desperation.   It means they have to decide whether to spend their meager income to keep the heat on, put food on the table, fill a needed prescription, or put a tank of gas in the car to keep from losing their job (or look for one).  For many of our clients, they simply do not have enough means to cover all of the above, and have to figure out how to stretch scant resources and then find additional help from community sources to fill the gaps.  It means figuring out which agencies provide what kind of help, and how much, and how often, and what hoops they have to jump through to get it.

There are other kinds of hunger that drive many of our clients.  For women in our shelter, it is the hunger to find gainful employment that will enable them to move into their own housing again.  For parents who use our Open Arms Child Care Center, it is the hunger to make sure their children have a safe, loving place to be while they are working hard at jobs or job training programs to help them make a better life for their families.  For them, it is the hunger to know that their children are not just sitting in front of a video all day, but are being helped to achieve appropriate developmental benchmarks in order to flourish when they enter kindergarten and move on through their school years.  For participants in our subsidized housing programs, it is the hunger to become self-sufficient and someday not have to rely on the kindness of strangers and housing programs to remain stable and independent.  For some, it is the hunger to access the treatment and help they need to eliminate or at least manage daunting physical and mental health difficulties – to be free from debilitating pain, depression, and anxieties.

Our staff and board experience hunger as well.  As much good work as we do here, we still find that there are many requests for assistance that we are forced to turn down, simply because our resources have already been spoken for.  We hunger to expand and improve our services, so that we can help even more of the  hurting families n our neighborhoods.  We hunger for more days when a struggling client walks in with a radiant smile and announces that she “got the job!”. We  hunger to see more joyful faces on the women and children who leave our shelter to move into their own apartment.

When you reach out and help our cause, whether it be a donation of food, a check to help defray the costs of our operations, or an hour of your time to help out, you are helping to stave off and even conquer the plethora of hungers that stalk the hallways of Pilgrims’ Inn.

As always, our warmest wishes for your home to be free of hunger, and full of joy.

Published in: on February 12, 2012 at 2:54 pm  Comments (2)  

It’s Tough To Be a Kid

ImageOn the surface, all of our programs primarily target adults.  Even our Open Arms Child Care is essentially a program that helps clients continue to work or attend job training, by providing safe, affordable child care.  But the majority of our clients have minor children, and the fact is they benefit as much if not even more from our services and support as their parents do.

That knowledge is never far from my thoughts, but I was reminded of it again by a compelling article on the Huffington Post by Marion Wright Edelman – http://tinyurl.com/6mpjbnq.  Edelman is renowned as a tough-as-nails advocate for children’s well-being in our country, and is the president of the Children’s Defense Fund.  In it, she shares startling data from the Census Bureau indicating that over half of the children in the US – a stunning 56.7% – live in households that are financially strapped, where parents struggle to put enough food on the table, keep the heat turned on, keep the rent paid.

At Pilgrims’ Inn, we know the catastrophic effects that chronic poverty and the seemingly endless stream of stressful, difficult situations that assault a struggling family can have on children.  When we catch up the rent and utilities for an adult who has fallen into hard times, we are also keeping her kids in their own, safe home.  When we invite a distraught, single mom into our shelter, we are also keeping her kids off the street.  Parents who carry a bag of groceries home from our emergency food pantry use it to feed their hungry sons and daughters.  Furthermore, while our child care program is a normal, state-licensed pre-school, we also provide our teachers with additional training that enables them to recognize that a child may be struggling with some of the potential effects of chronic poverty – learning disorders, developmental delays, physical or mental health problems, and more.  Often it is our teachers who first initiate the process of finding help for these children at a very early stage in a difficulty, while it can still be reversed.

Another benefit of our child care center – we work very closely with the Rock Hill School district, and shape our curriculum so that every “graduating” 4-year-old has achived all of the necessary benchmarks such as knowing their colors, numbers, how to write their name, etc. in order to at an equal developmental level with thier school mates as they enter kindergarten.  Studies show that being behind even at this early level can set the tone for struggles – and failures – for the rest of that child’s school career.  Instead of a string of failures, we set up our kids for success.

Furthermore, every child who is part of any of our programs has the option of working with our master’s level children’s counselor, Carol Bennett.  She not only provides extraordinary emotional support to the kids, she also helps parents learn good ways of dealing with problematic situations.  We also have a team of staff certified to teach “Triple P” (Positive Parenting Practices) classes on loving, effective ways for parents to nurture, support, and – when necessary – discipline their children.

I often tell my staff here that we will never see the majority of the impact our work has.  Because for every family we help stabilize by helping parents complete GED’s, acquire job skills, find gainful employment, learn better budgeting skills, improve their physical and mental health, and connect to community resources and more, we increase the likelihood that their children will graduate high school and perhaps attend college; avoid drug and alcohol abuse; avoid adolescent pregnancy or involvement in crime.  Which means as adults, their families may never have to experience the spectre of chronic impoverishment and instability that they survived as children.

There are many ways you can help us make life a little less tough for the kids that we serve – give us a call and let’s talk.

Published in: on January 8, 2012 at 3:11 pm  Comments Off  

It’s Tough To Be a Kid

ImageOn the surface, all of our programs primarily target adults.  Even our Open Arms Child Care is essentially a program that helps clients continue to work or attend job training, by providing safe, affordable child care.  But the majority of our clients have minor children, and the fact is they benefit as much if not even more from our services and support as their parents do.

That knowledge is never far from my thoughts, but I was reminded of it again by a compelling article on the Huffington Post by Marion Wright Edelman – http://tinyurl.com/6mpjbnq.  Edelman is renowned as a tough-as-nails advocate for children’s well-being in our country, and is the president of the Children’s Defense Fund.  In it, she shares startling data from the Census Bureau indicating that over half of the children in the US – a stunning 56.7% – live in households that are financially strapped, where parents struggle to put enough food on the table, keep the heat turned on, keep the rent paid.

At Pilgrims’ Inn, we know the catastrophic effects that chronic poverty and the seemilngly endless stream of stressful, difficult situations that assault a struggling family can have on children.  When we catch up the rent and utilities for an adult who has fallen into hard times, we are also keeping her kids in their own, safe home.  When we invite a distraught, single mom into our shelter, we are also keeping her kids off the street.  Parents who carry a bag of groceries home from our emergency food pantry use it to feed their hungry sons and daughters.  Furthermore, while our child care program is a normal, state-licensed pre-school, we also provide our teachers with additional training that enables them to recognize that a child may be struggling with some of the potential effects of chronic poverty – learning disorders, developmental delays, physical or mental health problems, and more.  Often it is our teachers who first initiate the process of finding help for these children at a very early stage in a difficulty, while it can still be reversed.

Another benefit of our child care center – we work very closely with the Rock Hill School district, and shape our curriculum so that every “graduating” 4-year-old has achived all of the necessary benchmarks such as knowing thier colors, numbers, how to write their name, etc. in order to at an equal developmental level with thier school mates as they enter kindergarten.  Studies show that being behind even at this early level can set the tone for struggles – and failures – for the rest of that child’s school career.  Instead of a string of failures, we set up our kids for success.

Furthermore, every child who is part of any of our programs has the option of working with our master’s level children’s counselor, Carol Bennett.  She not only provides extraordinary emotional support to the kids, she also helps parents learn good ways of dealing with problematic situations.  We also have a team of staff certified to teach “Triple P” (Positive Parenting Practices) classes on loving, effective ways for parents to nurture, support, and – when necessary – discipline their children. 

I often tell my staff here that we will never see the majority of the impact our work has.  Because for every family we help stabilize by helping parents complete GED’s, acquire job skills, find gainful employment, learn better budgeting skills, improve their physical and mental health, and connect to community resources and more, we increase the likelihood that their children will graduate high school and perhaps attend college; avoid drug and alcohol abuse; avoid adolescent pregnancy or involvement in crime.  Which means as adults, their families may never have to experience the spectre of chronic impoverishment and instability that they survived as children.

There are many ways you can help us make life a little less tough for the kids that we serve – give us a call and let’s talk.

Published in: on January 8, 2012 at 3:01 pm  Comments Off  

Silent Night…

As I write this it is night at the Inn, and it is indeed silent – not something that happens very often in the daytime hours!  I have stayed late to catch up on a variety of things, including updating our poor website, which has suffered from neglect for the last few months.

There is no question that the period of time between Thanksgiving and Christmas is the busiest, most hectic, most tiring, and most emotional of the entire year.  Talk about highs and lows!  HIGH – during this time a much larger volume of donations of food, clothing, household items, etc. come pouring in the building.  Our pantry becomes well-stocked – for a while – and we have good supplies to meet the needs of those who need food, coats, furniture, food, diapers, and more.  LOW – Our staff and volunteers are run ragged carrying, sorting, and storing the excess, rooms and hallways become cluttered with excess as storage space fills up.  HIGH – while it is a tremendous amount of work, it is also a tremendous joy to see how the community   responds to our Christmas families and goes all out to make sure all of our children have a good Christmas, families have “turkey with all the trimmings” for their holiday feast, and parties and fun events for our clients abound.  LOW – no matter how many presents they get or parties they attend or how many kind people reach out to make a difference for them, for many of our clients this is a terribly lonely, sad, and difficult time.  Life problems of poverty, homelessness, anxiety seem to be magnified even more in the glare of holiday lights, pretty wrapped packages and smiling faces.

I could go on and on, but suffice it to say that by the time we get to Christmas day our staff and clients are all feeling a bit wrung out.  So, we’ll be closed a few extra days over Christmas and New Years while everyone around here takes some time to hang out and catch our breath.

On behalf of the Inn, we wish all of you a very blessed holiday season; joy and good health for you and your loved ones; the blessings of a job, a safe home, and personal dignity.  We hope you’ll partner with us in continuing to “do good” for our community in 2012.

Published in: on December 21, 2011 at 10:37 pm  Comments Off  

Word of the Month – GRATITUDE

The word of the month for June is GRATITUDE with a capital G! We have been blessed by so many volunteers who have worked so hard on our behalf, it is difficult to list them all. The folks from the North Rock Hill Church have been with us for some time now, but recently spent hours both painting several of our administrative offices (that badly needed it) as well as building new, sturdy shelves and restructuring our food pantry (which needed it even more badly) just in time for the Post Office Food Drive. the drive brought us over 4000 pounds of food for the fight against hunger in our community, and thanks to the church we had plenty of space to put it up. The Harmony Community Fellowship spent a day cleaning every nook and cranny of our building and grounds, and the Calvary Baptist Church held a wonderful breakfast and reception for our clients. Then McHales Pub joined forces with our founder, Tricia Kuhlkin, and her husband, Dean Cline, to sponsor the 12th annual Irish Open Golf Tournament as a fundraiser for our programs. this was truly a family undertaking, the owner of Mchales is none other than Ms. Kuhlkin’s son, Brendan. The event was one of their highest attended ever, and the funds will be a tremendous boon during the summer months, when our financial donations traditionally get a little low. As if all of that bounty wasn’t enough, the Church 180 of Rock Hill joined forces with the Mountain Lake Church from the Atlanta, GA area to spend two weeks on a tremendous building project which will help us transform a large part of our administrative building into a state of the art training center to teach homeless mothers new job skills and support their efforts to become independent.

Check our website as we will soon post more detailed articles on these events with lots of great pictures. In the meantime, I’d like to say a few words about volunteerism. In addition to all of these larger events, we have also had our normal stream of wonderful volunteers who stop by to help clean, carry, mow, fold, drive, and do a host of other tasks that we cannot afford to pay for.

It is virtually impossible to run an organization like this without some significant costs of operation. Staff wages, utilities, insurances, and more must be covered or we simply could not open our doors. But our determination is to keep these kinds of costs to an absolute minimum and funnel every dollar possible into direct services to the individuals and families who come to us for help. We are able to do this in part, due to a veritable army of generous men, women, and even some children who provide services, goods, and other needs at no cost to us.

Just as an example, the rebuilding costs for our new learning center will not use one dime of our donors’ money. It is all covered by a small grant we received, coupled with donations from the churches involved and many, many local businesses that donated supplies, along with many local professionals who donated their services or charged a very reduced rate. Special mention must be made here of Dirk Theys, the contractor who headed up the learning center project and has given hundreds of hours of his time, at no charge.

But volunteerism does even more than providing us with work and supplies while saving us costs. There is something almost magic that happens when volunteers get a first-hand experience of the people we serve, the work that we do with them, and the fulfillment of seeing hurting families move from desperation to stability and independence. Many times someone who is dirty, sweaty, and exhausted from the work they just helped us with has told me they had the time of their lives. Many times I see the line between volunteer and client blur into true friendship and affection.

Volunteers witness how courageously our clients face their challenges, and how hard they work to accomplish their goals, and they are inspired.

Many heartfelt thank you’s to those who have already partnered with us in these ways. And if you haven’t I encourage you to think about becoming involved. It may turn out to be the best hard work of your life.

Published in: on June 19, 2011 at 10:30 pm  Comments Off  

The Butterfly Chronicles, Part 2

The “baby butterflies” have arrived!

If you missed the first post, our Open Arms Child Care Center is growing butterflies for a release later this spring. The kids have been fascinated from the moment they arrived, and are asking lots of excited questions about when the “flutterbies” will grow their wings. Follow the action in the next few weeks here and on our web site.

Published in: on April 2, 2011 at 9:00 pm  Comments Off  

The Kindness of Strangers

The world today is a busy place – for many of us, between work responsibilities, family resonsiblities, plus church, exercise, grocery shopping, walking the dog, and who-knows-what-else, time has become one of our most precious commidities. I therefore find it amazing that so many kind, generous (yet BUSY) people make a concerted effort to find the time to help us, and our clients. Many of them never get to meet the folks they are working so hard to help, yet they still bring their best efforts to the task. And the tasks are never particularly glamorous! They do office work, pound nails, bag food orders, sweep and mop floors, sew clothing, carry furniture, read stories, change diapers, drive vehicles, cut grass, paint walls, and so much more. They know the work they do for us matters, even if they don’t get to see the ultimate benefits firsthand.

I have asked some of them why they do it, and most will say that they know they can make a difference for hurting human beings – moms who don’t know which way to turn, kids who are vulnerable to so much potential harm, families that are barely hanging on – and that knowledge is enough for them.

For some, there are opportunities to meet some of the folks they are helping. We often hear from clients how touched they are by the kind words or gesture of compassin one of our volunteers makes, and we have seen some wonderful long-term friendships take place and flourish. For that matter, our clients often share how it lightened their heart to share a silly moment of laughter or do something purely for fun with a volunteer who has gone to the trouble of organizing a social time, dinner, etc.

I must admit that in the past it has sometimes been a challenge just to coordinate the time and efforts of the many wonderful folks who have called or emailed us with an offer to volunteer. It can be very time-consuming just to answer requests, schedule times, show someone around, answer questions, etc. With so many pressing resonsibilities on our plates around here I am afraid there have been times when someone wanted to help and we just didn’t get back to them in a timely manner. If that ever happened to you, we sincerely apologize and ask you to understand it was due to a crush of resopnsibilities, and not a lack of appreciation on our parts.

Happily I am also quite pleased to praise our two volunteer coordinators (who themselves are volunteers). Lorie Downan for some time has been faithfully maintaining a group email list of interested volunteers and “putting out the word” to them electronically whenever we had needs. More recently, Lisa Cox ( venicecoxes@yahoo.com ) stepped forward to take on duties to coordinate incoming offers of help with the needs we have, and has been doing a great job of getting back to potanetial individual and group volunteers very quickly and helping them plug into a need we have. If you are reading this and have a desire to make a real difference for people with very real needs, let Lisa know.

Like our clients, we have relied many times on the “kindness of strangers” to help us meet our needs and overcome our challenges. If you were one of those, thank you so much (and hopefully we got past the stranger phase in the process). We look forward to working with many more of you to continue to make inroads into chronic poverty and homelessness, and their devastating consequences to families in York County.

Published in: on March 23, 2011 at 5:54 pm  Comments Off  

Butterfly Chronicles: The Beginning

Our 4-year-old class is in for a treat – we just purchased the makings of a miracle! Reports Christina Dixon, the center director: “I just ordered the butterflies & habitat for the Pre-School classrooms. They will arrive on March 31 as caterpillars and they will transform into beautiful butterflies in 2-3 weeks. So by April 21, there should be beautiful butterflies able to fly away! The children are excited…they will talk about flowers, gardening, fruits and vegeatable at this time too! They will be container planting also!”

We will keep you posted on the progress.

Published in: on March 5, 2011 at 4:27 pm  Comments Off  
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